Elliott Hundley

Elliott Hundley, The Lightning's Bride (detail), 2011. Wood, sound board, inkjet print on Kitakata , pins, paper, plastic, magnifying lenses, metal, photographs, wire, and found paintings. 99 x 289 1/4 x 19 inches, 6 panels Courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles, and Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York © Elliott Hundley

Elliott Hundley, eyes that run like leaping fire, 2011. Wood, sound board, inkjet print on Kitakata, string, pins, paper, photographs, plastic, wire, and found embroidery. 98 1/2 x 240 5/8 x 11 3/8 inches, 5 panels Courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles, and Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York © Elliott Hundley Photo by Joshua White

Elliott Hundley, Pentheus, 2010. Sound board, wood, inkjet print on Kitakata, paper, photographs, pins, plastic, metal, glue, and magnifying glasses. 96 x 192 1/2 x 19 1/2 inches Courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles, and Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York © Elliott Hundley Photo by Jason Mandella

Elliott Hundley, Dionysus, 2010. Sound board, wood, inkjet print on kitakata, paper, photographs, pins, plastic, glue, found paintings, bull horn. 96 x 192 1/2 x 22 1/2 inches

Elliott Hundley, Cithairon Stained, 2010. C-print on metallic paper, 6 x 4 inches, Edition of 5

Elliott Hundley, Anne as Hekabe, 2009. Inkjet Print in Light Box, 24.5 x 36.5 x 5 inches, Edition of 4

Opening at The Wexner Center for the Arts, on September 16;  Elliott Hundley: The Bacchae.
From the Wexner:

Hundley conceives of his imposing mixed-media collages—or billboards, as he sometimes calls them—as theatrical landscapes that restage and animate the classical texts that are his sources. First orchestrating elaborate photo shoots using sitters who play characters from Greek mythology, Hundley interweaves the resulting photos with a vast array of organic and found materials, from wood to textiles, bamboo to spraypaint, and a variety of found ephemera. The works become dense narratives that take the form of monumental wall-mounted collages, which are complemented by free-standing, obliquely figural sculptures. Drawing on classical mythology, art history, philosophy, and drama, Hundley uses his idiosyncratic visual language to collapse historical and narrative time and to examine current socio-political conditions.

Images via Interview Magazine, The Wexner Center for the Arts, and Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

,

.

.

.

.

.

.

We may have no home of our own, but we are home wherever we go.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: